FRIDAY 26 JUNE 2020

friday 26 June 2020

 

 

St. Anthelm of Belley (1107–1178)

Anthelm was born in 1107 in a castle near Chambery, in Savoy, France. He was a prior of the Carthusian Grand Chartreuse and bishop of Belley. In liturgical art, Anthelm is depicted with a lamp lit by a divine hand. He was remarkable for monastic reforms.

 

 

Green

Entrance Antiphon: Ps 27: 8-9

The Lord is the strength of his people, a saving refuge for the one he has anointed. Save your people, Lord, and bless your heritage, and govern them forever.

 

Collect

Grant, O Lord, that we may always revere and love your holy name, for you never deprive of your guidance those you set firm on the foundation of your love. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

 

First reading: 2 Kings 25:1-12

In the ninth year of Zedekiah’s reign, in the tenth month, on the tenth day of the month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came with his whole army to attack Jerusalem; he pitched camp in front of the city and threw up earthworks round it. The city lay under siege till the eleventh year of King Zedekiah. In the fourth month, on the ninth day of the month, when famine was raging in the city and there was no food for the populace, a breach was made in the city wall. At once, the king made his escape under cover of dark, with all the fighting men, by way of the gate between the two walls, which is near the king’s garden – the Chaldaeans had surrounded the city – and made his way towards the Arabah. The Chaldaean troops pursued the king and caught up with him in the plains of Jericho, where all his troops deserted. The Chaldaeans captured the king and took him to the king of Babylon at Riblah, who passed sentence on him. He had the sons of Zedekiah slaughtered before his eyes, then put out Zedekiah’s eyes and, loading him with chains, carried him off to Babylon. In the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month – it was in the nineteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon – Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, an officer of the king of Babylon, entered Jerusalem. He burned down the Temple of the Lord, the royal palace and all the houses in Jerusalem. The Chaldaean troops who accompanied the commander of the guard demolished the walls surrounding Jerusalem. Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, deported the remainder of the population left behind in the city, the deserters who had gone over to the king of Babylon, and the rest of the common people. The commander of the guard left some of the humbler country people as vineyard workers and ploughmen.

 

Psalm 136(137):1-6

R/  O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not!

 

  1. By the rivers of Babylon there we sat and wept, remembering Zion; on the poplars that grew there we hung up our harps.
  2. For it was there that they asked us, our captors, for songs, our oppressors, for joy. ‘Sing to us,’ they said, ‘one of Zion’s songs.’
  3. O how could we sing the song of the Lord on alien soil? If I forget you, Jerusalem, let my right hand wither!
  4. O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not, if I prize not Jerusalem above all my joys!

 

Gospel Acclamation: Ps144:13

Alleluia, alleluia! The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds. Alleluia!

Gospel: Matthew 8:1-4

After Jesus had come down from the mountain large crowds followed him. A leper now came up and bowed low in front of him. ‘Sir,’ he said ‘if you want to, you can cure me.’ Jesus stretched out his hand, touched him and said, ‘Of course I want to! Be cured!’ And his leprosy was cured at once. Then Jesus said to him, ‘Mind you do not tell anyone, but go and show yourself to the priest and make the offering prescribed by Moses, as evidence for them.’

 

Prayer over the Offerings

Receive, O Lord, the sacrifice of conciliation and praise and grant that, cleansed by its action, we may make offering of a heart pleasing to you. Through Christ our Lord.

 

Communion Antiphon: Ps 144: 15

The eyes of all look to you, Lord, and you give them their food in due season.

 

Prayer after Communion

Renewed and nourished by the Sacred Body and Precious Blood of your Son, we ask of your mercy, O Lord, that what we celebrate with constant devotion may be our sure pledge of redemption. Through Christ our Lord.

 

 

Meditation

The value of every human life matters a lot. Jesus focuses on a leper Instead of tending to the great crowds that were following him. To be sick of leprosy was a horrible experience because one was not only physically isolated but suffered from loneliness and separation from society and religion. He breaks the norms of religion in order to enter into contact with Jesus. The law forbade lepers from talking to anyone and They had to keep away from the society. Jesus went as far as touching an unclean person which rendered him unclean as well. The leper is a man of faith for he asks, “Sir, if you want to, you can cure me.” and Jesus’ response “Of course I want to! Be cured! “shows that the man received double healing: first, from the sickness of leprosy which him unclean and secondly, from the sickness of solitude and loneliness. He becomes the centre of divine attention. Jesus’ welcoming of the leper was an infringement of social norms, but this gesture shows that everyone is welcome in his house, at his table and in his presence. Who are the lepers in our society today? We can identify some in our societies: some AIDS patients, some children born with disabilities, people whose points of view differ from ours and are thus treated with bias based on tribe, race or religion.

friday 26 June 2020

 

 

St. Anthelm of Belley (1107–1178)

Anthelm was born in 1107 in a castle near Chambery, in Savoy, France. He was a prior of the Carthusian Grand Chartreuse and bishop of Belley. In liturgical art, Anthelm is depicted with a lamp lit by a divine hand. He was remarkable for monastic reforms.

 

 

Green

Entrance Antiphon: Ps 27: 8-9

The Lord is the strength of his people, a saving refuge for the one he has anointed. Save your people, Lord, and bless your heritage, and govern them forever.

 

Collect

Grant, O Lord, that we may always revere and love your holy name, for you never deprive of your guidance those you set firm on the foundation of your love. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

 

First reading: 2 Kings 25:1-12

In the ninth year of Zedekiah’s reign, in the tenth month, on the tenth day of the month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came with his whole army to attack Jerusalem; he pitched camp in front of the city and threw up earthworks round it. The city lay under siege till the eleventh year of King Zedekiah. In the fourth month, on the ninth day of the month, when famine was raging in the city and there was no food for the populace, a breach was made in the city wall. At once, the king made his escape under cover of dark, with all the fighting men, by way of the gate between the two walls, which is near the king’s garden – the Chaldaeans had surrounded the city – and made his way towards the Arabah. The Chaldaean troops pursued the king and caught up with him in the plains of Jericho, where all his troops deserted. The Chaldaeans captured the king and took him to the king of Babylon at Riblah, who passed sentence on him. He had the sons of Zedekiah slaughtered before his eyes, then put out Zedekiah’s eyes and, loading him with chains, carried him off to Babylon. In the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month – it was in the nineteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon – Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, an officer of the king of Babylon, entered Jerusalem. He burned down the Temple of the Lord, the royal palace and all the houses in Jerusalem. The Chaldaean troops who accompanied the commander of the guard demolished the walls surrounding Jerusalem. Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, deported the remainder of the population left behind in the city, the deserters who had gone over to the king of Babylon, and the rest of the common people. The commander of the guard left some of the humbler country people as vineyard workers and ploughmen.

 

Psalm 136(137):1-6

R/  O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not!

 

  1. By the rivers of Babylon there we sat and wept, remembering Zion; on the poplars that grew there we hung up our harps.
  2. For it was there that they asked us, our captors, for songs, our oppressors, for joy. ‘Sing to us,’ they said, ‘one of Zion’s songs.’
  3. O how could we sing the song of the Lord on alien soil? If I forget you, Jerusalem, let my right hand wither!
  4. O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not, if I prize not Jerusalem above all my joys!

 

Gospel Acclamation: Ps144:13

Alleluia, alleluia! The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds. Alleluia!

Gospel: Matthew 8:1-4

After Jesus had come down from the mountain large crowds followed him. A leper now came up and bowed low in front of him. ‘Sir,’ he said ‘if you want to, you can cure me.’ Jesus stretched out his hand, touched him and said, ‘Of course I want to! Be cured!’ And his leprosy was cured at once. Then Jesus said to him, ‘Mind you do not tell anyone, but go and show yourself to the priest and make the offering prescribed by Moses, as evidence for them.’

 

Prayer over the Offerings

Receive, O Lord, the sacrifice of conciliation and praise and grant that, cleansed by its action, we may make offering of a heart pleasing to you. Through Christ our Lord.

 

Communion Antiphon: Ps 144: 15

The eyes of all look to you, Lord, and you give them their food in due season.

 

Prayer after Communion

Renewed and nourished by the Sacred Body and Precious Blood of your Son, we ask of your mercy, O Lord, that what we celebrate with constant devotion may be our sure pledge of redemption. Through Christ our Lord.

 

 

Meditation

The value of every human life matters a lot. Jesus focuses on a leper Instead of tending to the great crowds that were following him. To be sick of leprosy was a horrible experience because one was not only physically isolated but suffered from loneliness and separation from society and religion. He breaks the norms of religion in order to enter into contact with Jesus. The law forbade lepers from talking to anyone and They had to keep away from the society. Jesus went as far as touching an unclean person which rendered him unclean as well. The leper is a man of faith for he asks, “Sir, if you want to, you can cure me.” and Jesus’ response “Of course I want to! Be cured! “shows that the man received double healing: first, from the sickness of leprosy which him unclean and secondly, from the sickness of solitude and loneliness. He becomes the centre of divine attention. Jesus’ welcoming of the leper was an infringement of social norms, but this gesture shows that everyone is welcome in his house, at his table and in his presence. Who are the lepers in our society today? We can identify some in our societies: some AIDS patients, some children born with disabilities, people whose points of view differ from ours and are thus treated with bias based on tribe, race or religion.

friday 26 June 2020

 

 

St. Anthelm of Belley (1107–1178)

Anthelm was born in 1107 in a castle near Chambery, in Savoy, France. He was a prior of the Carthusian Grand Chartreuse and bishop of Belley. In liturgical art, Anthelm is depicted with a lamp lit by a divine hand. He was remarkable for monastic reforms.

 

 

Green

Entrance Antiphon: Ps 27: 8-9

The Lord is the strength of his people, a saving refuge for the one he has anointed. Save your people, Lord, and bless your heritage, and govern them forever.

 

Collect

Grant, O Lord, that we may always revere and love your holy name, for you never deprive of your guidance those you set firm on the foundation of your love. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

 

First reading: 2 Kings 25:1-12

In the ninth year of Zedekiah’s reign, in the tenth month, on the tenth day of the month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came with his whole army to attack Jerusalem; he pitched camp in front of the city and threw up earthworks round it. The city lay under siege till the eleventh year of King Zedekiah. In the fourth month, on the ninth day of the month, when famine was raging in the city and there was no food for the populace, a breach was made in the city wall. At once, the king made his escape under cover of dark, with all the fighting men, by way of the gate between the two walls, which is near the king’s garden – the Chaldaeans had surrounded the city – and made his way towards the Arabah. The Chaldaean troops pursued the king and caught up with him in the plains of Jericho, where all his troops deserted. The Chaldaeans captured the king and took him to the king of Babylon at Riblah, who passed sentence on him. He had the sons of Zedekiah slaughtered before his eyes, then put out Zedekiah’s eyes and, loading him with chains, carried him off to Babylon. In the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month – it was in the nineteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon – Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, an officer of the king of Babylon, entered Jerusalem. He burned down the Temple of the Lord, the royal palace and all the houses in Jerusalem. The Chaldaean troops who accompanied the commander of the guard demolished the walls surrounding Jerusalem. Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, deported the remainder of the population left behind in the city, the deserters who had gone over to the king of Babylon, and the rest of the common people. The commander of the guard left some of the humbler country people as vineyard workers and ploughmen.

 

Psalm 136(137):1-6

R/  O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not!

 

  1. By the rivers of Babylon there we sat and wept, remembering Zion; on the poplars that grew there we hung up our harps.
  2. For it was there that they asked us, our captors, for songs, our oppressors, for joy. ‘Sing to us,’ they said, ‘one of Zion’s songs.’
  3. O how could we sing the song of the Lord on alien soil? If I forget you, Jerusalem, let my right hand wither!
  4. O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not, if I prize not Jerusalem above all my joys!

 

Gospel Acclamation: Ps144:13

Alleluia, alleluia! The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds. Alleluia!

Gospel: Matthew 8:1-4

After Jesus had come down from the mountain large crowds followed him. A leper now came up and bowed low in front of him. ‘Sir,’ he said ‘if you want to, you can cure me.’ Jesus stretched out his hand, touched him and said, ‘Of course I want to! Be cured!’ And his leprosy was cured at once. Then Jesus said to him, ‘Mind you do not tell anyone, but go and show yourself to the priest and make the offering prescribed by Moses, as evidence for them.’

 

Prayer over the Offerings

Receive, O Lord, the sacrifice of conciliation and praise and grant that, cleansed by its action, we may make offering of a heart pleasing to you. Through Christ our Lord.

 

Communion Antiphon: Ps 144: 15

The eyes of all look to you, Lord, and you give them their food in due season.

 

Prayer after Communion

Renewed and nourished by the Sacred Body and Precious Blood of your Son, we ask of your mercy, O Lord, that what we celebrate with constant devotion may be our sure pledge of redemption. Through Christ our Lord.

 

 

Meditation

The value of every human life matters a lot. Jesus focuses on a leper Instead of tending to the great crowds that were following him. To be sick of leprosy was a horrible experience because one was not only physically isolated but suffered from loneliness and separation from society and religion. He breaks the norms of religion in order to enter into contact with Jesus. The law forbade lepers from talking to anyone and They had to keep away from the society. Jesus went as far as touching an unclean person which rendered him unclean as well. The leper is a man of faith for he asks, “Sir, if you want to, you can cure me.” and Jesus’ response “Of course I want to! Be cured! “shows that the man received double healing: first, from the sickness of leprosy which him unclean and secondly, from the sickness of solitude and loneliness. He becomes the centre of divine attention. Jesus’ welcoming of the leper was an infringement of social norms, but this gesture shows that everyone is welcome in his house, at his table and in his presence. Who are the lepers in our society today? We can identify some in our societies: some AIDS patients, some children born with disabilities, people whose points of view differ from ours and are thus treated with bias based on tribe, race or religion.

friday 26 June 2020

 

 

St. Anthelm of Belley (1107–1178)

Anthelm was born in 1107 in a castle near Chambery, in Savoy, France. He was a prior of the Carthusian Grand Chartreuse and bishop of Belley. In liturgical art, Anthelm is depicted with a lamp lit by a divine hand. He was remarkable for monastic reforms.

 

 

Green

Entrance Antiphon: Ps 27: 8-9

The Lord is the strength of his people, a saving refuge for the one he has anointed. Save your people, Lord, and bless your heritage, and govern them forever.

 

Collect

Grant, O Lord, that we may always revere and love your holy name, for you never deprive of your guidance those you set firm on the foundation of your love. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

 

First reading: 2 Kings 25:1-12

In the ninth year of Zedekiah’s reign, in the tenth month, on the tenth day of the month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came with his whole army to attack Jerusalem; he pitched camp in front of the city and threw up earthworks round it. The city lay under siege till the eleventh year of King Zedekiah. In the fourth month, on the ninth day of the month, when famine was raging in the city and there was no food for the populace, a breach was made in the city wall. At once, the king made his escape under cover of dark, with all the fighting men, by way of the gate between the two walls, which is near the king’s garden – the Chaldaeans had surrounded the city – and made his way towards the Arabah. The Chaldaean troops pursued the king and caught up with him in the plains of Jericho, where all his troops deserted. The Chaldaeans captured the king and took him to the king of Babylon at Riblah, who passed sentence on him. He had the sons of Zedekiah slaughtered before his eyes, then put out Zedekiah’s eyes and, loading him with chains, carried him off to Babylon. In the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month – it was in the nineteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon – Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, an officer of the king of Babylon, entered Jerusalem. He burned down the Temple of the Lord, the royal palace and all the houses in Jerusalem. The Chaldaean troops who accompanied the commander of the guard demolished the walls surrounding Jerusalem. Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, deported the remainder of the population left behind in the city, the deserters who had gone over to the king of Babylon, and the rest of the common people. The commander of the guard left some of the humbler country people as vineyard workers and ploughmen.

 

Psalm 136(137):1-6

R/  O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not!

 

  1. By the rivers of Babylon there we sat and wept, remembering Zion; on the poplars that grew there we hung up our harps.
  2. For it was there that they asked us, our captors, for songs, our oppressors, for joy. ‘Sing to us,’ they said, ‘one of Zion’s songs.’
  3. O how could we sing the song of the Lord on alien soil? If I forget you, Jerusalem, let my right hand wither!
  4. O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not, if I prize not Jerusalem above all my joys!

 

Gospel Acclamation: Ps144:13

Alleluia, alleluia! The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds. Alleluia!

Gospel: Matthew 8:1-4

After Jesus had come down from the mountain large crowds followed him. A leper now came up and bowed low in front of him. ‘Sir,’ he said ‘if you want to, you can cure me.’ Jesus stretched out his hand, touched him and said, ‘Of course I want to! Be cured!’ And his leprosy was cured at once. Then Jesus said to him, ‘Mind you do not tell anyone, but go and show yourself to the priest and make the offering prescribed by Moses, as evidence for them.’

 

Prayer over the Offerings

Receive, O Lord, the sacrifice of conciliation and praise and grant that, cleansed by its action, we may make offering of a heart pleasing to you. Through Christ our Lord.

 

Communion Antiphon: Ps 144: 15

The eyes of all look to you, Lord, and you give them their food in due season.

 

Prayer after Communion

Renewed and nourished by the Sacred Body and Precious Blood of your Son, we ask of your mercy, O Lord, that what we celebrate with constant devotion may be our sure pledge of redemption. Through Christ our Lord.

 

 

Meditation

The value of every human life matters a lot. Jesus focuses on a leper Instead of tending to the great crowds that were following him. To be sick of leprosy was a horrible experience because one was not only physically isolated but suffered from loneliness and separation from society and religion. He breaks the norms of religion in order to enter into contact with Jesus. The law forbade lepers from talking to anyone and They had to keep away from the society. Jesus went as far as touching an unclean person which rendered him unclean as well. The leper is a man of faith for he asks, “Sir, if you want to, you can cure me.” and Jesus’ response “Of course I want to! Be cured! “shows that the man received double healing: first, from the sickness of leprosy which him unclean and secondly, from the sickness of solitude and loneliness. He becomes the centre of divine attention. Jesus’ welcoming of the leper was an infringement of social norms, but this gesture shows that everyone is welcome in his house, at his table and in his presence. Who are the lepers in our society today? We can identify some in our societies: some AIDS patients, some children born with disabilities, people whose points of view differ from ours and are thus treated with bias based on tribe, race or religion.

friday 26 June 2020

 

 

St. Anthelm of Belley (1107–1178)

Anthelm was born in 1107 in a castle near Chambery, in Savoy, France. He was a prior of the Carthusian Grand Chartreuse and bishop of Belley. In liturgical art, Anthelm is depicted with a lamp lit by a divine hand. He was remarkable for monastic reforms.

 

 

Green

Entrance Antiphon: Ps 27: 8-9

The Lord is the strength of his people, a saving refuge for the one he has anointed. Save your people, Lord, and bless your heritage, and govern them forever.

 

Collect

Grant, O Lord, that we may always revere and love your holy name, for you never deprive of your guidance those you set firm on the foundation of your love. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

 

First reading: 2 Kings 25:1-12

In the ninth year of Zedekiah’s reign, in the tenth month, on the tenth day of the month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came with his whole army to attack Jerusalem; he pitched camp in front of the city and threw up earthworks round it. The city lay under siege till the eleventh year of King Zedekiah. In the fourth month, on the ninth day of the month, when famine was raging in the city and there was no food for the populace, a breach was made in the city wall. At once, the king made his escape under cover of dark, with all the fighting men, by way of the gate between the two walls, which is near the king’s garden – the Chaldaeans had surrounded the city – and made his way towards the Arabah. The Chaldaean troops pursued the king and caught up with him in the plains of Jericho, where all his troops deserted. The Chaldaeans captured the king and took him to the king of Babylon at Riblah, who passed sentence on him. He had the sons of Zedekiah slaughtered before his eyes, then put out Zedekiah’s eyes and, loading him with chains, carried him off to Babylon. In the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month – it was in the nineteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon – Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, an officer of the king of Babylon, entered Jerusalem. He burned down the Temple of the Lord, the royal palace and all the houses in Jerusalem. The Chaldaean troops who accompanied the commander of the guard demolished the walls surrounding Jerusalem. Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, deported the remainder of the population left behind in the city, the deserters who had gone over to the king of Babylon, and the rest of the common people. The commander of the guard left some of the humbler country people as vineyard workers and ploughmen.

 

Psalm 136(137):1-6

R/  O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not!

 

  1. By the rivers of Babylon there we sat and wept, remembering Zion; on the poplars that grew there we hung up our harps.
  2. For it was there that they asked us, our captors, for songs, our oppressors, for joy. ‘Sing to us,’ they said, ‘one of Zion’s songs.’
  3. O how could we sing the song of the Lord on alien soil? If I forget you, Jerusalem, let my right hand wither!
  4. O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not, if I prize not Jerusalem above all my joys!

 

Gospel Acclamation: Ps144:13

Alleluia, alleluia! The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds. Alleluia!

Gospel: Matthew 8:1-4

After Jesus had come down from the mountain large crowds followed him. A leper now came up and bowed low in front of him. ‘Sir,’ he said ‘if you want to, you can cure me.’ Jesus stretched out his hand, touched him and said, ‘Of course I want to! Be cured!’ And his leprosy was cured at once. Then Jesus said to him, ‘Mind you do not tell anyone, but go and show yourself to the priest and make the offering prescribed by Moses, as evidence for them.’

 

Prayer over the Offerings

Receive, O Lord, the sacrifice of conciliation and praise and grant that, cleansed by its action, we may make offering of a heart pleasing to you. Through Christ our Lord.

 

Communion Antiphon: Ps 144: 15

The eyes of all look to you, Lord, and you give them their food in due season.

 

Prayer after Communion

Renewed and nourished by the Sacred Body and Precious Blood of your Son, we ask of your mercy, O Lord, that what we celebrate with constant devotion may be our sure pledge of redemption. Through Christ our Lord.

 

 

Meditation

The value of every human life matters a lot. Jesus focuses on a leper Instead of tending to the great crowds that were following him. To be sick of leprosy was a horrible experience because one was not only physically isolated but suffered from loneliness and separation from society and religion. He breaks the norms of religion in order to enter into contact with Jesus. The law forbade lepers from talking to anyone and They had to keep away from the society. Jesus went as far as touching an unclean person which rendered him unclean as well. The leper is a man of faith for he asks, “Sir, if you want to, you can cure me.” and Jesus’ response “Of course I want to! Be cured! “shows that the man received double healing: first, from the sickness of leprosy which him unclean and secondly, from the sickness of solitude and loneliness. He becomes the centre of divine attention. Jesus’ welcoming of the leper was an infringement of social norms, but this gesture shows that everyone is welcome in his house, at his table and in his presence. Who are the lepers in our society today? We can identify some in our societies: some AIDS patients, some children born with disabilities, people whose points of view differ from ours and are thus treated with bias based on tribe, race or religion.

friday 26 June 2020

 

 

St. Anthelm of Belley (1107–1178)

Anthelm was born in 1107 in a castle near Chambery, in Savoy, France. He was a prior of the Carthusian Grand Chartreuse and bishop of Belley. In liturgical art, Anthelm is depicted with a lamp lit by a divine hand. He was remarkable for monastic reforms.

 

 

Green

Entrance Antiphon: Ps 27: 8-9

The Lord is the strength of his people, a saving refuge for the one he has anointed. Save your people, Lord, and bless your heritage, and govern them forever.

 

Collect

Grant, O Lord, that we may always revere and love your holy name, for you never deprive of your guidance those you set firm on the foundation of your love. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

 

First reading: 2 Kings 25:1-12

In the ninth year of Zedekiah’s reign, in the tenth month, on the tenth day of the month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came with his whole army to attack Jerusalem; he pitched camp in front of the city and threw up earthworks round it. The city lay under siege till the eleventh year of King Zedekiah. In the fourth month, on the ninth day of the month, when famine was raging in the city and there was no food for the populace, a breach was made in the city wall. At once, the king made his escape under cover of dark, with all the fighting men, by way of the gate between the two walls, which is near the king’s garden – the Chaldaeans had surrounded the city – and made his way towards the Arabah. The Chaldaean troops pursued the king and caught up with him in the plains of Jericho, where all his troops deserted. The Chaldaeans captured the king and took him to the king of Babylon at Riblah, who passed sentence on him. He had the sons of Zedekiah slaughtered before his eyes, then put out Zedekiah’s eyes and, loading him with chains, carried him off to Babylon. In the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month – it was in the nineteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon – Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, an officer of the king of Babylon, entered Jerusalem. He burned down the Temple of the Lord, the royal palace and all the houses in Jerusalem. The Chaldaean troops who accompanied the commander of the guard demolished the walls surrounding Jerusalem. Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, deported the remainder of the population left behind in the city, the deserters who had gone over to the king of Babylon, and the rest of the common people. The commander of the guard left some of the humbler country people as vineyard workers and ploughmen.

 

Psalm 136(137):1-6

R/  O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not!

 

  1. By the rivers of Babylon there we sat and wept, remembering Zion; on the poplars that grew there we hung up our harps.
  2. For it was there that they asked us, our captors, for songs, our oppressors, for joy. ‘Sing to us,’ they said, ‘one of Zion’s songs.’
  3. O how could we sing the song of the Lord on alien soil? If I forget you, Jerusalem, let my right hand wither!
  4. O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not, if I prize not Jerusalem above all my joys!

 

Gospel Acclamation: Ps144:13

Alleluia, alleluia! The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds. Alleluia!

Gospel: Matthew 8:1-4

After Jesus had come down from the mountain large crowds followed him. A leper now came up and bowed low in front of him. ‘Sir,’ he said ‘if you want to, you can cure me.’ Jesus stretched out his hand, touched him and said, ‘Of course I want to! Be cured!’ And his leprosy was cured at once. Then Jesus said to him, ‘Mind you do not tell anyone, but go and show yourself to the priest and make the offering prescribed by Moses, as evidence for them.’

 

Prayer over the Offerings

Receive, O Lord, the sacrifice of conciliation and praise and grant that, cleansed by its action, we may make offering of a heart pleasing to you. Through Christ our Lord.

 

Communion Antiphon: Ps 144: 15

The eyes of all look to you, Lord, and you give them their food in due season.

 

Prayer after Communion

Renewed and nourished by the Sacred Body and Precious Blood of your Son, we ask of your mercy, O Lord, that what we celebrate with constant devotion may be our sure pledge of redemption. Through Christ our Lord.

 

 

Meditation

The value of every human life matters a lot. Jesus focuses on a leper Instead of tending to the great crowds that were following him. To be sick of leprosy was a horrible experience because one was not only physically isolated but suffered from loneliness and separation from society and religion. He breaks the norms of religion in order to enter into contact with Jesus. The law forbade lepers from talking to anyone and They had to keep away from the society. Jesus went as far as touching an unclean person which rendered him unclean as well. The leper is a man of faith for he asks, “Sir, if you want to, you can cure me.” and Jesus’ response “Of course I want to! Be cured! “shows that the man received double healing: first, from the sickness of leprosy which him unclean and secondly, from the sickness of solitude and loneliness. He becomes the centre of divine attention. Jesus’ welcoming of the leper was an infringement of social norms, but this gesture shows that everyone is welcome in his house, at his table and in his presence. Who are the lepers in our society today? We can identify some in our societies: some AIDS patients, some children born with disabilities, people whose points of view differ from ours and are thus treated with bias based on tribe, race or religion.

friday 26 June 2020

 

 

St. Anthelm of Belley (1107–1178)

Anthelm was born in 1107 in a castle near Chambery, in Savoy, France. He was a prior of the Carthusian Grand Chartreuse and bishop of Belley. In liturgical art, Anthelm is depicted with a lamp lit by a divine hand. He was remarkable for monastic reforms.

 

 

Green

Entrance Antiphon: Ps 27: 8-9

The Lord is the strength of his people, a saving refuge for the one he has anointed. Save your people, Lord, and bless your heritage, and govern them forever.

 

Collect

Grant, O Lord, that we may always revere and love your holy name, for you never deprive of your guidance those you set firm on the foundation of your love. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

 

First reading: 2 Kings 25:1-12

In the ninth year of Zedekiah’s reign, in the tenth month, on the tenth day of the month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came with his whole army to attack Jerusalem; he pitched camp in front of the city and threw up earthworks round it. The city lay under siege till the eleventh year of King Zedekiah. In the fourth month, on the ninth day of the month, when famine was raging in the city and there was no food for the populace, a breach was made in the city wall. At once, the king made his escape under cover of dark, with all the fighting men, by way of the gate between the two walls, which is near the king’s garden – the Chaldaeans had surrounded the city – and made his way towards the Arabah. The Chaldaean troops pursued the king and caught up with him in the plains of Jericho, where all his troops deserted. The Chaldaeans captured the king and took him to the king of Babylon at Riblah, who passed sentence on him. He had the sons of Zedekiah slaughtered before his eyes, then put out Zedekiah’s eyes and, loading him with chains, carried him off to Babylon. In the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month – it was in the nineteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon – Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, an officer of the king of Babylon, entered Jerusalem. He burned down the Temple of the Lord, the royal palace and all the houses in Jerusalem. The Chaldaean troops who accompanied the commander of the guard demolished the walls surrounding Jerusalem. Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, deported the remainder of the population left behind in the city, the deserters who had gone over to the king of Babylon, and the rest of the common people. The commander of the guard left some of the humbler country people as vineyard workers and ploughmen.

 

Psalm 136(137):1-6

R/  O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not!

 

  1. By the rivers of Babylon there we sat and wept, remembering Zion; on the poplars that grew there we hung up our harps.
  2. For it was there that they asked us, our captors, for songs, our oppressors, for joy. ‘Sing to us,’ they said, ‘one of Zion’s songs.’
  3. O how could we sing the song of the Lord on alien soil? If I forget you, Jerusalem, let my right hand wither!
  4. O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not, if I prize not Jerusalem above all my joys!

 

Gospel Acclamation: Ps144:13

Alleluia, alleluia! The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds. Alleluia!

Gospel: Matthew 8:1-4

After Jesus had come down from the mountain large crowds followed him. A leper now came up and bowed low in front of him. ‘Sir,’ he said ‘if you want to, you can cure me.’ Jesus stretched out his hand, touched him and said, ‘Of course I want to! Be cured!’ And his leprosy was cured at once. Then Jesus said to him, ‘Mind you do not tell anyone, but go and show yourself to the priest and make the offering prescribed by Moses, as evidence for them.’

 

Prayer over the Offerings

Receive, O Lord, the sacrifice of conciliation and praise and grant that, cleansed by its action, we may make offering of a heart pleasing to you. Through Christ our Lord.

 

Communion Antiphon: Ps 144: 15

The eyes of all look to you, Lord, and you give them their food in due season.

 

Prayer after Communion

Renewed and nourished by the Sacred Body and Precious Blood of your Son, we ask of your mercy, O Lord, that what we celebrate with constant devotion may be our sure pledge of redemption. Through Christ our Lord.

 

 

Meditation

The value of every human life matters a lot. Jesus focuses on a leper Instead of tending to the great crowds that were following him. To be sick of leprosy was a horrible experience because one was not only physically isolated but suffered from loneliness and separation from society and religion. He breaks the norms of religion in order to enter into contact with Jesus. The law forbade lepers from talking to anyone and They had to keep away from the society. Jesus went as far as touching an unclean person which rendered him unclean as well. The leper is a man of faith for he asks, “Sir, if you want to, you can cure me.” and Jesus’ response “Of course I want to! Be cured! “shows that the man received double healing: first, from the sickness of leprosy which him unclean and secondly, from the sickness of solitude and loneliness. He becomes the centre of divine attention. Jesus’ welcoming of the leper was an infringement of social norms, but this gesture shows that everyone is welcome in his house, at his table and in his presence. Who are the lepers in our society today? We can identify some in our societies: some AIDS patients, some children born with disabilities, people whose points of view differ from ours and are thus treated with bias based on tribe, race or religion.

friday 26 June 2020

 

 

St. Anthelm of Belley (1107–1178)

Anthelm was born in 1107 in a castle near Chambery, in Savoy, France. He was a prior of the Carthusian Grand Chartreuse and bishop of Belley. In liturgical art, Anthelm is depicted with a lamp lit by a divine hand. He was remarkable for monastic reforms.

 

 

Green

Entrance Antiphon: Ps 27: 8-9

The Lord is the strength of his people, a saving refuge for the one he has anointed. Save your people, Lord, and bless your heritage, and govern them forever.

 

Collect

Grant, O Lord, that we may always revere and love your holy name, for you never deprive of your guidance those you set firm on the foundation of your love. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

 

First reading: 2 Kings 25:1-12

In the ninth year of Zedekiah’s reign, in the tenth month, on the tenth day of the month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came with his whole army to attack Jerusalem; he pitched camp in front of the city and threw up earthworks round it. The city lay under siege till the eleventh year of King Zedekiah. In the fourth month, on the ninth day of the month, when famine was raging in the city and there was no food for the populace, a breach was made in the city wall. At once, the king made his escape under cover of dark, with all the fighting men, by way of the gate between the two walls, which is near the king’s garden – the Chaldaeans had surrounded the city – and made his way towards the Arabah. The Chaldaean troops pursued the king and caught up with him in the plains of Jericho, where all his troops deserted. The Chaldaeans captured the king and took him to the king of Babylon at Riblah, who passed sentence on him. He had the sons of Zedekiah slaughtered before his eyes, then put out Zedekiah’s eyes and, loading him with chains, carried him off to Babylon. In the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month – it was in the nineteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon – Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, an officer of the king of Babylon, entered Jerusalem. He burned down the Temple of the Lord, the royal palace and all the houses in Jerusalem. The Chaldaean troops who accompanied the commander of the guard demolished the walls surrounding Jerusalem. Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, deported the remainder of the population left behind in the city, the deserters who had gone over to the king of Babylon, and the rest of the common people. The commander of the guard left some of the humbler country people as vineyard workers and ploughmen.

 

Psalm 136(137):1-6

R/  O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not!

 

  1. By the rivers of Babylon there we sat and wept, remembering Zion; on the poplars that grew there we hung up our harps.
  2. For it was there that they asked us, our captors, for songs, our oppressors, for joy. ‘Sing to us,’ they said, ‘one of Zion’s songs.’
  3. O how could we sing the song of the Lord on alien soil? If I forget you, Jerusalem, let my right hand wither!
  4. O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not, if I prize not Jerusalem above all my joys!

 

Gospel Acclamation: Ps144:13

Alleluia, alleluia! The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds. Alleluia!

Gospel: Matthew 8:1-4

After Jesus had come down from the mountain large crowds followed him. A leper now came up and bowed low in front of him. ‘Sir,’ he said ‘if you want to, you can cure me.’ Jesus stretched out his hand, touched him and said, ‘Of course I want to! Be cured!’ And his leprosy was cured at once. Then Jesus said to him, ‘Mind you do not tell anyone, but go and show yourself to the priest and make the offering prescribed by Moses, as evidence for them.’

 

Prayer over the Offerings

Receive, O Lord, the sacrifice of conciliation and praise and grant that, cleansed by its action, we may make offering of a heart pleasing to you. Through Christ our Lord.

 

Communion Antiphon: Ps 144: 15

The eyes of all look to you, Lord, and you give them their food in due season.

 

Prayer after Communion

Renewed and nourished by the Sacred Body and Precious Blood of your Son, we ask of your mercy, O Lord, that what we celebrate with constant devotion may be our sure pledge of redemption. Through Christ our Lord.

 

 

Meditation

The value of every human life matters a lot. Jesus focuses on a leper Instead of tending to the great crowds that were following him. To be sick of leprosy was a horrible experience because one was not only physically isolated but suffered from loneliness and separation from society and religion. He breaks the norms of religion in order to enter into contact with Jesus. The law forbade lepers from talking to anyone and They had to keep away from the society. Jesus went as far as touching an unclean person which rendered him unclean as well. The leper is a man of faith for he asks, “Sir, if you want to, you can cure me.” and Jesus’ response “Of course I want to! Be cured! “shows that the man received double healing: first, from the sickness of leprosy which him unclean and secondly, from the sickness of solitude and loneliness. He becomes the centre of divine attention. Jesus’ welcoming of the leper was an infringement of social norms, but this gesture shows that everyone is welcome in his house, at his table and in his presence. Who are the lepers in our society today? We can identify some in our societies: some AIDS patients, some children born with disabilities, people whose points of view differ from ours and are thus treated with bias based on tribe, race or religion.

friday 26 June 2020

 

 

St. Anthelm of Belley (1107–1178)

Anthelm was born in 1107 in a castle near Chambery, in Savoy, France. He was a prior of the Carthusian Grand Chartreuse and bishop of Belley. In liturgical art, Anthelm is depicted with a lamp lit by a divine hand. He was remarkable for monastic reforms.

 

 

Green

Entrance Antiphon: Ps 27: 8-9

The Lord is the strength of his people, a saving refuge for the one he has anointed. Save your people, Lord, and bless your heritage, and govern them forever.

 

Collect

Grant, O Lord, that we may always revere and love your holy name, for you never deprive of your guidance those you set firm on the foundation of your love. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

 

First reading: 2 Kings 25:1-12

In the ninth year of Zedekiah’s reign, in the tenth month, on the tenth day of the month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came with his whole army to attack Jerusalem; he pitched camp in front of the city and threw up earthworks round it. The city lay under siege till the eleventh year of King Zedekiah. In the fourth month, on the ninth day of the month, when famine was raging in the city and there was no food for the populace, a breach was made in the city wall. At once, the king made his escape under cover of dark, with all the fighting men, by way of the gate between the two walls, which is near the king’s garden – the Chaldaeans had surrounded the city – and made his way towards the Arabah. The Chaldaean troops pursued the king and caught up with him in the plains of Jericho, where all his troops deserted. The Chaldaeans captured the king and took him to the king of Babylon at Riblah, who passed sentence on him. He had the sons of Zedekiah slaughtered before his eyes, then put out Zedekiah’s eyes and, loading him with chains, carried him off to Babylon. In the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month – it was in the nineteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon – Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, an officer of the king of Babylon, entered Jerusalem. He burned down the Temple of the Lord, the royal palace and all the houses in Jerusalem. The Chaldaean troops who accompanied the commander of the guard demolished the walls surrounding Jerusalem. Nebuzaradan, commander of the guard, deported the remainder of the population left behind in the city, the deserters who had gone over to the king of Babylon, and the rest of the common people. The commander of the guard left some of the humbler country people as vineyard workers and ploughmen.

 

Psalm 136(137):1-6

R/  O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not!

 

  1. By the rivers of Babylon there we sat and wept, remembering Zion; on the poplars that grew there we hung up our harps.
  2. For it was there that they asked us, our captors, for songs, our oppressors, for joy. ‘Sing to us,’ they said, ‘one of Zion’s songs.’
  3. O how could we sing the song of the Lord on alien soil? If I forget you, Jerusalem, let my right hand wither!
  4. O let my tongue cleave to my mouth if I remember you not, if I prize not Jerusalem above all my joys!

 

Gospel Acclamation: Ps144:13

Alleluia, alleluia! The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds. Alleluia!

Gospel: Matthew 8:1-4

After Jesus had come down from the mountain large crowds followed him. A leper now came up and bowed low in front of him. ‘Sir,’ he said ‘if you want to, you can cure me.’ Jesus stretched out his hand, touched him and said, ‘Of course I want to! Be cured!’ And his leprosy was cured at once. Then Jesus said to him, ‘Mind you do not tell anyone, but go and show yourself to the priest and make the offering prescribed by Moses, as evidence for them.’

 

Prayer over the Offerings

Receive, O Lord, the sacrifice of conciliation and praise and grant that, cleansed by its action, we may make offering of a heart pleasing to you. Through Christ our Lord.

 

Communion Antiphon: Ps 144: 15

The eyes of all look to you, Lord, and you give them their food in due season.

 

Prayer after Communion

Renewed and nourished by the Sacred Body and Precious Blood of your Son, we ask of your mercy, O Lord, that what we celebrate with constant devotion may be our sure pledge of redemption. Through Christ our Lord.

 

 

Meditation

The value of every human life matters a lot. Jesus focuses on a leper Instead of tending to the great crowds that were following him. To be sick of leprosy was a horrible experience because one was not only physically isolated but suffered from loneliness and separation from society and religion. He breaks the norms of religion in order to enter into contact with Jesus. The law forbade lepers from talking to anyone and They had to keep away from the society. Jesus went as far as touching an unclean person which rendered him unclean as well. The leper is a man of faith for he asks, “Sir, if you want to, you can cure me.” and Jesus’ response “Of course I want to! Be cured! “shows that the man received double healing: first, from the sickness of leprosy which him unclean and secondly, from the sickness of solitude and loneliness. He becomes the centre of divine attention. Jesus’ welcoming of the leper was an infringement of social norms, but this gesture shows that everyone is welcome in his house, at his table and in his presence. Who are the lepers in our society today? We can identify some in our societies: some AIDS patients, some children born with disabilities, people whose points of view differ from ours and are thus treated with bias based on tribe, race or religion.

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